24-26 Howard Street

Glasshouse Street and its offshoots get short shrift from local history resources generally. The site is frequently mentioned as an aside, but rarely discussed on its own merits. Always one for an underdog, I therefore peruse the locale regularly, both in person and in terms of online research.

At the junction with Howard Street there is a wonderful Victorian building (officially 24-26 Howard Street) that always catches my eye. I love the brickwork over the windows, and the soot and grime on the bricks on the upper levels. I imagine some of this would have been from steam blown out of engines passing through Victoria Station. The businesses housed within it change fairly regularly. I remember buying balloons from a party shop there in the early 2000s, and it now seems to be a beauty salon. There seems to be a residential element nowadays, with some doors and letterboxes on Glasshouse Street itself.

In the hours I’ve spent looking through old photographs of Nottingham, this building has cropped-up a number of times, standing in the background like a silent sentinel overseeing the many changes around it. I bought a colour photograph from eBay of an engine being manoeuvred on a turntable in Victoria Station circa 1960, and sure enough my old pal 24-26 Howard Street was visible at street level in the background. In researching Glasshouse Street generally, I chanced upon an image from Picture The Past of several women enjoying an outing in a charabanc, and they had — of course — paused just by the building for a quick photoshoot. I’ll be mortified if it ever gets knocked down.

I’m in the process of assembling info on Glasshouse Street and its surrounds for a longer post, but thought I’d whet your appetite with this little appreciation of a long-overlooked artifact of yesteryear.

Howard Street